test

CHNetwork Online Community Forums Have You Heard? How Catholic is your stance on immigration?

21 replies, 7 voices Last updated by Profile photo of sewnsew sewnsew 6 months, 4 weeks ago
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #21015
    Profile photo of Ann op
    Ann op
    Participant
    @Annop

    It’s too bad there are no “like” buttons here.  All these very positive responses are affirming.  There is still the issue of many communicants within the Church – active participants within the laity and even among the consecrated – who question or openly deny Church teaching in one area or another.  This is especially true in the areas of sexual morality & immigration, as David pointed out earlier.  The ironic part is that people who deny Church teaching on sexual morality are generally on one side of the political spectrum and people who deny Church teaching on immigration are on the other side politically.  This is damaging to Church unity – the unity that Jesus sought when He prayed that we would be one as Jesus is one with the Father.  The Church would have a stronger message in these areas if we could agree on it.  Jennie in an earlier post mentions the “Old Enemy” Lucifer.  Surely the Evil One who is the great divider is behind this division. Our best weapon is prayer.  But I also wonder if silence on these subjects also feeds into the divisiveness.  And yet bringing up these subjects often results in extremely emotional confrontations.  That is why this forum is very encouraging- that we can have a positive discussion here.  Thank you all.

    #21019
    Profile photo of Jennie1964
    Jennie1964
    Keymaster
    @Jennie1964

    Our first reading in Leviticus 19 for this upcoming Sunday addresses this, Ann op. It says:

    You must not bear hatred for your brother in your heart. You must openly tell him, your neighbour, of his offence; this way you will not take a sin upon yourself.”

    Of course, in not bearing him hatred, Scripture assumes we tell him out of love. Once again, there is that word! If we do not have love for our neighbour then we will not tell him the truth in love. Speaking personally, I will keep my mouth shut when I am too busy thinking about myself and what their reaction will be toward me. In a word, I say nothing when I am in selfish mode. Love takes a great deal of courage. Just think of Christ on that cross! Now THAT was courage. He knew the upcoming trial would be awful, and he even asked the Father to take the cup from Him, but only if that was what the Father wanted.

    Love takes courage. Loves put the other person before myself. Love is willing to bear pain, loneliness, gossip, and all the other terrible things that go with it. Once again, if we the Church cannot speak truthfully for love, no matter what the cost, we have lost our saltiness and we fail to shed light. And the example of love has to start at that good old grass-roots level. It has to start with me.

    #21020
    Profile photo of David W. Emery
    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    One can hardly disagree with “speaking the truth in love.” The problem arises when people mistake pity or vengeance or self-seeking for love. This is what I see happening among the worldly and those who follow them.

    From Ann op:

    The ironic part is that people who deny Church teaching on sexual morality are generally on one side of the political spectrum and people who deny Church teaching on immigration are on the other side politically. This is damaging to Church unity – the unity that Jesus sought when He prayed that we would be one as Jesus is one with the Father.

    When you look at what people are advocating in each of these areas, it amounts to a denial of other people’s humanity. The Church has a consistent and defensible doctrine, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” which covers both these aberrations. So the problem is one of political parties and their platforms, and of people, especially Catholics, sinning by adopting a worldly viewpoint.

    Yes, it is damaging to the Church, but not in the “institutional” way usually portrayed. Rather, we must understand it in the sense of, “If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together” (1 Corinthians 12:26). This is because the Church is not simply an institution, but an organism, where we are members of each other and all participate in the health and sickness of the whole mystical body.

    Because sin is damaging to humanity as a whole, to the common good, it affects every individual, whether a member of the Church or not. And it shows why the Church — all of us who are Catholic Christians — must do our part for the good of mankind.

    David

    #21022
    Profile photo of Jennie1964
    Jennie1964
    Keymaster
    @Jennie1964

    Well said, David! We must constantly remind ourselves that we are NOT an institution, but rather a living organism with God the Son as our Head!

    #21032
    Profile photo of gachristian
    gachristian
    Participant
    @gachristian

    I just want everyone to know I have enjoyed this discussion.  I was going to  pipe in earlier but didn’t want to try to do so on my little tablet!  However I think everything was said that I was going to say.

    The article was very insightful and balanced.

    #21034
    Profile photo of David W. Emery
    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    Have no worry that you will not be contributing, gachristian. Your insight is valuable, even when you are simply agreeing with others. And have no doubts about using your tablet. I’m replying to you on a tablet.

    David

    #21252
    Profile photo of sewnsew
    sewnsew
    Participant
    @sewnsew

    It is a difficult topic for me- I am an immigrant and it was a hard process, through which I didn’t receive help from various local non profits whose purpose was to help people through the immigration process becuase ” we don’t help your kind of immigrant, you are not a minority, you come from a first world country( in which due to political issues between French and English Canada) I could not work in my trained profession whereas I could here in the US, etc.” I finally after getting no where in the process took their advice and used $900 of the $1,800 dollars I had in my name and hired an immigration lawyer.  By the time my work visa came though and I could go back to work at my job I had $0.69 in my checking, and $1.89 in savings- which the bank closed as well an empty gas tank. So yes the process should be looked at but on the other hand every country has a right to decide and enforce their own laws.

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

@

Not recently active