test

CHNetwork Online Community Forums Other Topics observation about protestant converts to Catholicism and vice versa

21 replies, 14 voices Last updated by Profile photo of Jennie1964 Jennie1964 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #14968
    Profile photo of tarbal79
    tarbal79
    Participant
    @tarbal79

    Thanks Becky and Dave. I agree with Howard that many Catholics that leave the Church don't really know the faith like they should. I think with websites like this and EWTN and other Catholic outlets we are getting better informed about our faith-if we are willing to put forth the effort to find the places to go.  I do feel that there are also those out there claiming to be Catholic but deny the teachings of the Church and that is also confusing to some Catholics-i.e. Catholics for Choice, Catholics United to name a few. We have been told that we can do anything we want and that we should not tell others how to live their lives and when the bishops speak out against something those that are lax or empathic about their faith are unprepared to defend the bishops or the faith.

    #14967
    Profile photo of GoodSoil
    GoodSoil
    Participant
    @GoodSoil

    I think it's much simpler.  Aside from whose truer, Protestant comes from the word protest. “We are a tiny minority confronting error in order to get people saved” and Catholic means universal “What unites not divides?  If I can't respect the beliefs can I respect the person?”  I'm rather an angry convert but that is my weakness…it is Catholic to look for the good.

    #14966
    Profile photo of Pani Rose
    Pani Rose
    Participant
    @Pani Rose

    I think most of the Catholic converts to evangelical Protestantism were relatively untaught, unevangelized and unconverted while in the Catholic Church.  They were “awakened” by Protestants.  Also, I personally see a positive difference in the Catholic Church in America today versus the Catholic Church in America when I was a kid prior to Vatican II.  I tell people, especially ex-Catholics of my vintage, that from what I can see there has been a continuous, on-going revival since Vatican II.

    I could be wrong but I see the first half of the 20th century as somewhat of a dark age in both mainline Protestantism and American Catholicism suffering from the ravages of liberalism and biblical illiteracy.

    In the Archdiocese of Denver, I am very impressed with the average Catholics I have met so far and their level of devotion and knowledge.  Opportunities for instruction, community and service abound.

    Brother don't leave out rationalism  😛

    #14965
    Profile photo of sewnsew
    sewnsew
    Participant
    @sewnsew

    I could be wrong but I see the first half of the 20th century as somewhat of a dark age in both mainline Protestantism and American Catholicism suffering from the ravages of liberalism and biblical illiteracy.

    I really believe that in a nutshell that is Christianity's problem for this century and the end of the last one!  I fight the concept of relativism in my daughter's thinking constantly. i see a general lack of knowledge of the faith and history in both Protestant and Catholic circles- which of course affects one's mindset and beliefs.

    #21856
    Profile photo of LJ23
    lj23
    Participant
    @lj23

    In a few comments above tarbal79 says,

    When I was going through RCIA in 1985 the priest told me and my wife that converts make better Catholics because they choose to be Catholic while most born Catholics just go through the motions because that is all they know. Protestants that come into the Church know that each part of any journey is as important as either the starting or the ending point.

    I am currently making a transition from being a Protestant to Catholicism. As a Catholic I was unaware of the pearls as one said here and a mentality I see still occurring, not only with the American people. Like – Most of us omit the stuff we don’t like and practice what’s convenient, saying things like my parents taught me this and so I do it (not the church “my parents”), more like a handed down belief, I can understand if children said this, but not with adults in this age and time.

    As a former Catholic I too didn’t have the best things to say in regards to what I learnt and I am guilty of that.

    Now as I am drawn towards the Catholic faith again, my pursuit is to give Her my all. To live by faith and works (I’ve come understand that if the four men had not lowered the paralytic man he may have not been healed that day; the faith and act of lowering the mat were in conjunction).

    I truly pray that God would speak to the hearts of the authority in the Catholic Church that they would promote reading of scripture and how they relate to tradition of the Catholic Church as an importance subject (as part of confirmation, a mini RCIA course perhaps). My heart aches when I hear some of the explanations given by my Catholic peers as rebuttal’s for their belief. I too was swept away because of the lack in understanding why I believed what I believed, when I joined the Protestant church.

    Now, I’m not only drawn to the Church Jesus founded but I’ m also driven to learn more and how to plainly make the opposition understand, why is it that I believe what I believe.

    Please keep me in your prayers and correct me if what I’m saying needs correction.

    God bless.

    Elle.

     

     

    #21857
    Profile photo of David W. Emery
    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    As a Catholic I was unaware of the pearls as one said here and a mentality I see still occurring, not only with the American people. Like – Most of us omit the stuff we don’t like and practice what’s convenient, saying things like, my parents taught me this and so I do it (not the church, “my parents”), more like a handed down belief, I can understand if children said this, but not with adults in this age and time.– lj23

    Elle, this manifests the infantile level of belief and practice of those Christians. I see it, not only among Catholics, but throughout all Christian traditions. These people stopped learning and growing in their faith when they were very young. Then, when they become adults, their roots do not penetrate not deep enough to draw the sap of grace from the ground of faith, so they remain at a superficial level of rules and rote learning and never develop that person-to-person relationship with the Lord which is essential to authentic Christianity. The reductionism you describe — omitting the inconvenient parts — is the natural result.

    David

    #21860
    Profile photo of Jennie1964
    Jennie1964
    Keymaster
    @Jennie1964

    I need to get running off to work, but this problem you describe is not a new one, Elle. Remember that Paul himself chastized the Corinthians (I think it was the Corinthians) for still having to be bottle fed when by that time they should have been tackling the steak! I have found that some of this is just readiness on our part which is not our choice; we cannot understand what we are not ready to understand. But some of it is also choice on our part; are we continuously trying to learn and understand, and then when we do understand something new, are we deliberately practicing it! If we are not faithful in practicing what we do understand, if we are not faithful in the little things, then God will not allow us to move further and be faithful in much. The giving of grace by God, and the working out of the same grace by us, goes hand in hand.

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

@

Not recently active