test
10 replies, 4 voices Last updated by  David W. Emery 3 months, 1 week ago
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #25873

    Katherine
    Participant
    @cosbap

    Is the character Veronica made up? There’s no trace in the bible, and even her name “true image” sounds fabricated. Is there a supposed relic of the towel with the image? Is it meant to be taken seriously? Or is it just a literary device to aid imagination of a desire to comfort Jesus, and His being the true Image of God?

    #25881

    kileguru
    Participant
    @kileguru

    According to tradition, Veronica is a saint.  I don’t think the Church “makes stuff up.”  I don’t think it is merely a literary device to aid the imagination either.  The Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholics also hold “Veronica” to be a saint, although, they would call her something different.  There have been visions of St. Veronica by mystics, also.  Again, these visions are private revelations, but St. Veronica doesn’t contradict anything in the Magisterium.  I am not very intelligent, and these are my views; someone far more intelligent than me could probably answer your question better. God bless you 🙂

    #25882

    Howard Hampson
    Keymaster
    @Howard the Pilgrim

    Hi Katherine,

    I googled Saint Veronica and pretty much came up with what Kile has posted.  A couple of sources mentioned the cloth being at the Vatican.  I am inclined to believe in her existence as she is enshrined in the Stations of the Cross at the Catholic Church.  It would not surprise me that some woman took pity on Jesus on his way up the Via Dolorosa to Golgotha for Luke 23:27 records, “And there followed him a great multitude of the people, and of women who bewailed and lamented him.”  (RSVCE)  Perhaps her real name is unknown and she came to be called by the name or title of the cloth with which Jesus rewarded her for her kindness and her courage.

    As far as something not being in the Bible, the Apostle John says, “There are also many other things that Jesus did, but if these were to be described individually, I do not think the whole world would contain the books that would be written.”  John 21:25 NABRE  I see that as including events that happened to Jesus.  The Apostle Paul also mentioned oral and written traditions.

    So as I participate in or pray the Stations of the Cross, I honor her and her kindness to Jesus and His kindness to her in giving her his image imprinted on her cloth.  Our Lady of Guadalupe also did a similar thing.  One of the things I appreciate about the Catholic Church is mystery.  That everything is not nailed down and 100% verifiable to satisfy our materialistic and rationalistic tendencies.

    #25891

    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    You may already have seen the Wikipedia article, which contains most of what we know about St. Veronica, but if not, here’s the link: Saint Veronica. Here’s another one on the towel, or “veil”: Link.

    Was Veronica a made-up person? Probably not; as Howard indicates, she was probably a real person who did a real kindness to Jesus as he proceeded on his way to Calvary. However, since her name was not known, she was given a coined name based on her function (this is described in the Wikipedia article). This is the same approach that was followed when people spoke about the soldier who pierced Jesus’ side as he hung lifeless on the cross. They called him Longinus, which is the Latin name for “spear.” In the same manner, we have the rich man in Jesus’ parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus; he was called Dives, which means “rich.”

    David

    #25896

    kileguru
    Participant
    @kileguru

    And don’t forget about St. Dismas 😉

    #26097

    Katherine
    Participant
    @cosbap

    Thank you everyone. It sounds like it’s built into a legend, but may have a foundation of truth.

    I found it a very beneficial prayer. I was able to attend one at my parish which I think was the Liguori one with bible verses added. I also went to several at an abbey. They used a different basic script which remained the same each time, and used different scripture readings each day. I really liked the Hebrews one. They had 15 stations and concluded with the resurrection.

    Is it only done in lent?

    #26103

    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    I found it a very beneficial prayer.

    That’s my feeling about it, too. My wife has a different opinion, based on her desire to avoid anything having to do with suffering and death. But I think that sentiment is misplaced. Christianity is based precisely on an acceptance of suffering and death as inevitable. If we seek to avoid them, we will be frustrated, because they will come regardless of our fear and abhorrence.

    Special versions of the Stations of the Cross are invented for many public occasions. However, the one written by St. Alphonsus Liguori is still the most popular after several centuries, probably because it follows the traditional pattern and does not try to do anything unique. It’s just good, solid spiritual nourishment.

    David

    #26116

    Katherine
    Participant
    @cosbap

    I liked the Ligouri one. The monks used a version that is similar, but pared down quite a lot. It doesn’t have that hymn and misses some of the repeated phrases. It took about 10 minutes rather than half an hour, but they did it every day except Sunday in the lead up to the Triduum.

    Do people do it throughout the year or only in lent?

    #26117

    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    Do people do it throughout the year or only in lent?

    I had intended to answer that question earlier, but was very busy, juggling several projects at once.

    The Stations of the Cross are, of course, especially apropos to Lent, but the prayers can be used at any time during the year. I use them as meditation points whenever the mood strikes me, because they speak of the price of my salvation. That is a topic which is worthwhile in any season.

    David

    #26131

    Katherine
    Participant
    @cosbap

    Thank you. I think St Teresa recommended frequent meditation on Christ’s passion.

    #26134

    David W. Emery
    Keymaster
    @David W. Emery

    Yes, she did. In my experience, many others, especially priests, have recommended the same.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

@

Not recently active